A project of the European University 'Viadrina', Frankfurt, Germany (Study and Research Centre on Media Law, Law Faculty)
Wiki-Watch's infos:
Please wait while Wiki-Watch
is checking all edits of this article!
Media Section


Newsletter:
E-Mail:
Format: HTML Text
Let's check Wikipedia:   
Observation period: last hour / last 24 hours / last 3 days / last week / last two weeks / last month
Wiki-Watch's rating:
Please wait while Wiki-Watch
is checking all edits of this article!
Number of visitors:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Kho.
Kho Sin-Khie
Polish-Chinese Davis Cup match 1939.jpg
Kho Sin-Kie (second from left) in Poland
Country Republic of China (1912–49) Republic of China
Born (1912-09-02)2 September 1912
Banyumas Regency,
Dutch East Indies[1]
Died 31 January 1947(1947-01-31) (aged 34)
London, United Kingdom
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Turned pro 1929 (amateur tour)[2]
Retired 1947 (due to death)
Singles
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open 4R (1936)[3]
Wimbledon 4R (1938)[4]
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French Open 3R (1936)[5]

Kho Sin-Khie (Chinese: 许承基; pinyin: Xu Chengji, Mandarin pronunciation: [xǔ tʂʰəŋ˧˥tɕi˥˩]; September 2, 1912 – January 31, 1947) was an Indonesian-born tennis player who represented the Republic of China in the Davis Cup.[1][6] He was from the Peranakan Chinese ethnic group.[2] He was the first Chinese player ever to win a major international tournament.[7] He won twice the British Hard Court Championships and the Surrey Grass Court Championships on one occasion. He was a Swiss, Italian and Swedish champion as well.[1]

Early years[edit]

Kho was born and raised in Java to a poor family[8] in an eggplant farm where his father, Han Ting was the head of the village.[9] He had three brothers and three sisters.[9] After he had been dropped out of school[8] he started playing tennis at the age of 14,[2] while working in a sports equipment store.[10] In the early years he had troubles to make his father understand his admiration for the game.[11] In 1929 he won the Central Java Tennis Championship.[2] In 1932 his parents passed away.[9] He won the All-Java Championship in 1933.[2] In 1933 he won the Chinese national championships topping Qiufei Hai of Shanghai.[8] In 1935 he became the Chinese national champion for the second time after beating compatriot Khoo Hooi Hye[12] and subsequently was named the top Chinese player.[13] Local people raised money for him to support his post-graduate education in Switzerland.[10] In 1936 he arrived to Great Britain to attend college and in the mean time he was offered a job at the Chinese Embassy.[14] He studied commerce in London.[7] Later he was sponsored by the Dunlop Rubber Company.[8]

Tennis career[edit]

He played his first international matches in 1934 when he toured Sumatra challenging the Netherlands Davis Cup team.[15] In Kisaran he met Cornelius Bryan (Champion of Sumatra[16]) whom he beat after e decider third set.[15] In doubles Bryan and team member Henrik Timmer equalized the tally in a three-set victory against the Chinese. Then they moved to Siantar where at the inaugural of the Simeloengoen Club two one-set matches were held. Bryan and Kho went toe-to-toe in singles with Kho victorious. Then he faced Alsbach and won six to four. This was followed by the doubles between Timmer-Bryan and Alsbach-Kho, which was abandoned due to Bryan's injury with Khos' leading one set and one break in the second, while the Bryan was serving to stay in the match.[15] In Medan he beat Bryan in a normal match in straights and had his match with Alsbach interrupted as it started raining.[16]

In 1935 the Dutch Indies Tennis Association invited a couple of European players to play a series of exhibition matches in the Orient. In Surabaya he paired with Nami to face Giorgio de Stefani and Enrique Maier and lost in two sets. Then the party traveled to Surakarta where singles matches were held and Kho faced de Stefani with the Italian coming out victoriously. Then on a rematch in Semarang Kho prevailed fro the first time over de Stefani in front a home crowd of two thousand.[17] While touring America Kho reached the doubles finals of the 1935 Kansas City Championships alongside Lewis D Carson eventually ceding the victory to Wilbur Coen and William Kiley.[18] The same year he debuted in the Davis Cup against the United States Davis Cup team and lost all three of his rubbers.[6]

Kho won numerous tournaments in Europe, most notably winning the British Hard Court Championships twice, in 1938 and 1939 and was a runner-up in 1946.[19]

In 1934 he was scheduled to represent his country at the 1934 Far Eastern Games, which was unfortunately cancelled.[20] He met Giorgio de Stefani again for the Dutch Championships in 1936 eventually losing to him.[21] Also in 1936 he reached the fourth round of the 1936 French Championships in singles surpassing previous opponents such as Jean Lesueur and Robert Murray[3] and reached the third round of the mixed doubles partnering Mademoiselle Terwinot.[5]

In the New Years Eve tournament of 1936–37 at the Beausite – L. T. C. de Cannes he defeated Vladimir Landau and won the doubles as well with him.[22] At the same event he and miss Simone Mathieu won the mixed contest.[23] In January 1937 he won the Monegasque Championships against Gaston Médécin.[24] In February he captured the Gallia L.T.C. de Cannes title beating home favorite Jacques Brugnon in straight sets.[25] They paired for the doubles of the Nice Lawn Tennis Club where they triumphed over Jean Lesueur and William Robertson. Kho also took the singles trophy.[26] Also in February at Carlton Club of Cannes Brugnon and Kho were on the opposite side in the mixed semifinals where they teamed with Simone Matthieu and Nancy Liebert respectively.[27] In the end the French couple advanced to the finals. For the men's doubles Brugnon and Robertson formed a team this time and met in the final with Kho and Landau.[27] In May he clinched the Priory tournament from Daniel Prenn.[28] In July he won the Midlands Counties tournament in Edgbaston.[29] In September he was in both singles and doubles finals of the Hungarian International Tennis Championships in Budapest.[30] He was a finalist for the Paris International Championships in the same month where he was overcome by Croatian Franjo Punčec.[31]

In March 1938 at the International Championships of Cairo he was defeated by Roderich Menzel in the semifinals.[32] In April he defended his South of France title against Swiss Max Ellmer and this time gained the doubles crown as well partnering Brugnon.[33] In May he not only deprived Bunny Austin of his British Hard Court Championships title but gained the doubles title as well with Irishman George Lyttleton-Rogers against the British duo of Donald William Butler and Frank Wilde.[34] In June he reached the Queen's Club Championships final but was annihilated by Bunny Austin. He was able to win only two games and received a so-called bagel in the second set.[35] In October he wrapped the Sussex Club title in Brighton from Dennis C. Coombe of New Zealand.[36] Later that month he reached the fourth round of the 1938 Wimbledon Championships by scoring victories over Harold Hare, Georg von Metaxa and Ian Collins.[4]

In February 1939 he won his second Gallia championships in singles and doubles with Jacques Brugnon.[37] In March Brugnon and Kho lost the International Championships of Cairo doubles to the team of Gottfried von Cramm and Pat Hughes.[38] In April he claimed his first Italian trophy at the L. T. C. di Rome International Championships by defeating Germany Davis Cup team reserve W. Beuthner in the semis and Constantin Tanacescu for the title.[39] In May he took the Surrey Grass Court Championships against Murray Deloford in straight sets.[40] Later that year he won the Hastings tournament.[20]

In 1945 he won the Midlands Counties Championships for the second time and retained his title the next year against Argentine Enrique Morea.[41] In 1946 he went for the North of England title but was eliminated in both the singles and doubles finals by Jack Edwin Harper and Harper-Cam Malfroy respectively.[42] In May he served the first and only Davis Cup victory for the First Republic of China by winning all three of his rubbers against the Denmark Davis Cup team.[6] While in London on 31 January 1947, Kho was admitted to hospital with double pneumonia and died soon after.[19]

Kho appeared in six Davis Cup ties for China, between 1935–1946.[6] He won eight of his 18 rubbers.[6]

In the club level scene he represented the International Tennis Club of Great Britain.[43]

During World War II[edit]

On January 27, 1940 he married Jane Margaret Gordon Balfour,[44] daughter of E.J. Gordon Balfour, a judge in Ceylon. They've met in England at the Queen's Club where both of them practised. They moved to the Dutch East Indies and stayed there for the time of the war.[45] In order to help his country against the Empire of Japan he participated in a series of exhibition matches with Englishman Pat Hughes in the Malacca Lawn Tennis Club. The ticket sales income was transferred to the Malaya Patriotic Fund and the War Fund.[46] In 1940 he became Malayan Champion in singles and mixed doubles.[47] He continued on to get featured in exhibition matches in 1941.[48]

Playing style[edit]

In an 1938 article contemporary Australian tennis player and subsequent chairman of Lawn Tennis Association of Victoria Mervyn Weston described Kho as a drop shot expert, who has a fine control over the ball disguising it so well that it reached a "deadly effect". He had a whipped forehand accompanied by an excellent net game and service and assisted by a formidable backhand. He possessed an athletic body type with a height of 5'11". He was a calm but opportunist player.[7]

Titles[edit]

Year Tournament City Opponent in the final Score in the final
1937 Monaco Monegasque Championships Monte Carlo Monaco Gaston Medecin 6–3, 6–2, 6–3
1937 France South of France Championships Nice France Jean Lesueur 13–11, 6–3, 4–6, 6–3
1938 United Kingdom British Hard Court Championships Bournemouth United Kingdom Bunny Austin 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
1939 United Kingdom British Hard Court Championships Bournemouth Republic of China (1912–49) Wai-Chuen Choy 7–5, 6–1, 6–4
1939 United Kingdom Surrey Grass Court Championships Surbiton United Kingdom Murray Deloford 6–2, 6–4

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sam Setyautama; Suma Mihardja (2008). Tokoh-tokoh etnis Tionghoa di Indonesia [Key people of ethnic Chinese in Indonesia] (in Indonesian). Kepustakaan Populer Gramedia. p. 129. ISBN 9789799101259. Retrieved November 1, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Leo Suryadinata (1995). Prominent Indonesian Chinese: Biographical Sketches. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. ISBN 9789813055049. 
  3. ^ a b "Roland-Garros 1936 (Grand Slam) - Men singles" (pdf). fft.fr. Paris, France: Fédération Française de Tennis. 2006. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Phil Ploquin. "Wimbledon 1938". scoreshelf.com. Santa Clara, California, United States: Go Daddy. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Tennis" (PDF). Le Petit Dauphinois (in French) (Grenoble, France: Joseph Besson) 60 (142): 57. May 21, 1936. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Davis Cup Profile
  7. ^ a b c Mervyn Weston (May 25, 1938). "New Stars of Tennis Firmament". The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Australia: The Herald and Weekly Times) VI (1,475): 12. Retrieved November 7, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c d 奥林匹克运动概览 [Overview of the Olympic Movement] (in Chinese). sports and fitness network. January 3, 2011. Retrieved October 31, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c Yao Pengto (February 1995). 网球名将许承基 [Tennis star Xu Chengji] (Thesis) (in Chinese). Beijing, China: China Academic Journal electronic magazine, Tsinghua University. Retrieved October 31, 2012. 
  10. ^ a b 网球的起源与发展 [The origin and development of tennis] (in Chinese). Bengbu, China: Bengbu Tennis Association. March 28, 2012. Retrieved October 31, 2012. 
  11. ^ "China's loss". Western Mail (Perth, Western Australia, Australia: John Wesley Dafoe): 13. March 6, 1947. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  12. ^ "Death of Khoo Chooi Hye". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 12. July 27, 1936. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Gene Smith at home after net tour to Orient". Berkeley Daily Gazette (Berkeley, California, United States: Gazette Pub. Co.): 15. April 28, 1936. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  14. ^ "China to foster her athletes". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press) (264): 25. January 10, 1937. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  15. ^ a b c H. Mulder, ed. (November 23, 1934). "Kho Sin Kie" (pdf). Het Nieuws Van den Dag (in Dutch) (Amsterdam, Netherlands: Albrecht & Co.) 39 (270): 19. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  16. ^ a b "Java tennis champion". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press) (152): 12. November 18, 1934. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  17. ^ Enrique G. Maier (March 29, 1935). "Tenis; Andanzas de no jugador de tenis por la India Holandesa" [Tennis; tour of the tennis players to Dutch Indies] (PDF). La Vanguardia (in Spanish) (Barcelona, Spain: Carlos Godó Valls): 12. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  18. ^ Associated Press (July 8, 1935). "Helen Moody stages a comeback". Emporia Gazette (Emporia, Kansas, United States: William Allen White): 6. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  19. ^ a b The Argus, "Kho Sin Kie Dies", February 4, 1947
  20. ^ a b "Hughes And Sin Kie arrive in Singapore". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (16,150): 8. July 27, 1940. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  21. ^ Reuter (July 13, 1936). "Kho Sin Kie Beaten in Dutch final". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 14. Retrieved October 4, 2012. 
  22. ^ Albert Lejeune, ed. (January 4, 1937). "Tennis". Le Petit Niçois (in French) (Nice, France: Borriglione) 57 (4): 5. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  23. ^ "El Torneo Internacional de Cannes" [Cannes international tournament] (PDF). Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (Barcelona, Spain): 3. January 8, 1937. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  24. ^ Albert Lejeune, ed. (January 25, 1937). "Tennis sur la Cote D'Azur" [Tennis at the Cote D'Azur]. Le Petit Niçois (in French) (Nice, France: Borriglione) 57 (25): 9. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  25. ^ Albert Lejeune, ed. (February 3, 1937). "Tennis, A Cannes". Le Petit Niçois (in French) (Nice, France: Borriglione) 57 (34): 8. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  26. ^ Albert Lejeune, ed. (February 16, 1937). "Tennis, Au Nice Lawn Tennis Club". Le Petit Niçois (in French) (Nice, France: Borriglione) 57 (47): 8. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  27. ^ a b Alexis Brézet, ed. (February 3, 1937). "Le tournoi de Carlton á Cannes" [The Cannes-Carlton tournament]. Le Figaro (in French) (Paris, France: Dassault Group). ISSN 0182-5852. Retrieved November 14, 2012. 
  28. ^ Reuter (May 21, 1937). "Kho defeats Prenn". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 5. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Kho Sin Kie wins". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (15,704): 7. July 12, 1937. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Magyarország 1937. évi teniszbajnokságai" [Tennis Championships of Hungary 1937] (in Hungarian). Budapest, Hungary: Huszadik század. September 1937. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  31. ^ "Lawn tennis tournaments". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 14. September 28, 1937. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  32. ^ W.G.N. De Keizer, ed. (March 21, 1938). "Kho Sin Kie Geslagen" [Kho Sin Kie beaten] (pdf). Het Nieuws Van den Dag (in Dutch) (Amsterdam, Netherlands: W. A. Van Goudoever) 43 (65): 11. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  33. ^ "Kho Sin Kie wins in France". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press) (328): 28. April 3, 1938. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  34. ^ "Tennis". Winnipeg Free Press (Winnipeg, Canada: John Wesley Dafoe): 16. May 2, 1938. ISSN 0828-1785. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  35. ^ "Murray Ends British Title Drought At Queen's Club". atpworldtour.com. London, United Kingdom: Association of Tennis Professionals. June 14, 2009. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  36. ^ "Win for Kho Sin Kie". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (15,596): 16. October 11, 1938. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  37. ^ "Kho Sin Kie wins at Cannes". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (15,209): 16. February 17, 1939. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  38. ^ "International tennis; Hughes and Cramm win". The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: John Fairfax and Sons) 108 (31,587): 15. March 28, 1939. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  39. ^ W. Belonje, ed. (April 27, 1939). "Kho Sin Kie" (pdf). Het Nieuws Van den Dag (in Dutch) (Amsterdam, Netherlands: Albrecht & Co.) 44 (87): 11. Retrieved October 29, 2012. 
  40. ^ "Kho Sin Kie Wins Surrey Title". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 17. May 29, 1939. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  41. ^ "El Torneo Internacional de Birmingham" [Birmingham international tournament] (PDF). Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (Barcelona, Spain): 3. July 15, 1946. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  42. ^ "Tennis Championships". Cairns Post (Cairns, Australia: Frederick Wimble) 64 (13,773): 2. April 25, 1946. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  43. ^ "When Austin forgot his shorts" (PDF). Advocate (Burnie, Tasmania, Australia: Harris publications): 8. April 19, 1938. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  44. ^ "Kho Sin-Khie marries in London". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (15,995): 1. January 27, 1940. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  45. ^ "Kho Sin Kie's fiancee". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 10. February 10, 1940. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  46. ^ "Hughes And Sin Kie In Malacca". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Mohammed Eunos) (16,159): 9–10. August 7, 1940. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  47. ^ "New Champions in all events in Malayan tennis". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 15. August 6, 1940. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
  48. ^ "Exhibition tennis at Y.M.C.A". The Straits Times (Singapore, Straits Settlements: Straits Times Press): 15. August 13, 1941. Retrieved October 28, 2012. 
This page "Kho Sin-Kie" originates from Wikipedia and is licensed under GNU-license for free documentation and the license "Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike". Additional conditions might be applicable. Please see terms of use described.
SY 1